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the deficit. going over the fiscal cliff is the best thing we're going to get out of washington in terms of serious production to the deficit. we will suffer, but we got ourselves into this. we're not going to get out without some pain. i think we are going to go over the cliff. >> let me quickly say i don't favor going over the cliff, but howe regard is right. if you're worried about the deficit, the easiest way is to go over the cliff. you have increases right away. >> yeah. >> can i ask you, though, how can you guarantee e that all the extra tax hikes and provisions actually go towards paying the national debt and not more spending and more programs? >> you can't guarantee that but you have a conservative republican congress. they are not going to vote for any spending increase. why not take advantage of that and make the initial cuts and let them go into a stalemate for awhile. that's a pretty big amount. my sges that provides the certainty. we go back to the clinton tax rates. and we make significant cuts to the deficit and they say, hey, they did something substantial about the maj
apparent progress on the so-called fiscal cliff talks. actually that's putting it mildly. it appears both sides may be digging in their heels. joining me now, congressional reporter for the washington "post" ed o'keefe and washington reporter for the hill, amie parnes. amie let's get with the president's proposal first. it includes $1.6 trillion tax hikes over ten years, that's raising rates on the top 2%, making over $250,000. now this proposal also calls for $50 billion in immediate stimulus, and $400 million in long-term savings from the entitlement program. the gop says, this is just a wish list for the democrats and a nonstarter. can you explain where we are in all this? >> no, not really, i can't. i mean it's all a big mess right now, you know, they're in a stalemate apparently. the president is kind of optimistic. he says he's optimistic that there's going to be a deal by christmas. reporters are keeping our fingers crossed so we can actually head home for the holidays. i think washington is, too. but i think that, you know, everyone sort of is trying to figure out out. i think whi
to the public amid the fierce fiscal cliff fight. after holding a campaign-like stop in pennsylvania friday, the president today is urging congress to extend middle class tax cuts in his weekly address. >> both parties say we should keep middle class taxes low. the senate's already passed a bill to keep income taxes from going up on middle class families. democrats in the house are ready to do the same thing. if we can just get a few house republicans on board, i'll sign this bill as soon as congress sends it my way. >> the gop is also out today with new criticism of the president's plan. here's republican senator orrin hatch of utah. >> what he proposed this week was a classic bait and switch on the american people. a tax increase double the size of what he campaigned on. billions of dollars in new stimulus spending. and an unlimited, unchecked authority to borrow from the chinese. maybe i missed it, but i don't recall him asking for any of that during the presidential campaign. >> joining me now, white house reporter for the "washington post" david nakamara and congressional reporter for
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3